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Biblical Studies Carnival - Mad as a March Hare 2017 1/5




Roll up, roll up, welcome to 2017 Mad as a March Hare Bibliobloggers carnival!

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Kia ora koutou. Welcome to southern New Zealand and the magnificent university city of Dunedin.


I'm your ebullient host, Jonathan Rivett Robinson, you may remember me from previous Biblioblogger Carnivals like 2012 April Fools and 2010 Oktoberfest. Yes, more than just a a list of links, this is a meeting of minds in the sweating heaving flesh pots of Biblical blogs. I'm here to put the carnal in the carnival, attached to these magnificent intellectual conceptual constructions are bags of meat that eat, sleep and poop, just like everyone else. So don't be intimidated just cos that chick can speak Ugaritic, sidle up to her and leave a comment on her blog, it could be the start of a beautiful friendship. Don't be scared just because he can quote Hans Urs von Balthsasar, you might have spotted a fault in his thesis that he will be forever grateful for to you. Even though their blog is more stylish and sophisticated than yours, remember they are here for the same thing, they are Bible geeks too. Don't just read, take advantage of the power of blogging to interact with other human beings, who you might otherwise never meet.

You know folks, this is serious. Many Biblioblogs have fallen silent in recent years, many links that used to live are now dead. Others have abandoned the purity of blogging to tweet incessantly and attempt to encapsulate complex thoughts in 140 characters. Is this any way to live? All is not lost however, new blogs frequently spring up from the ashes of the old, look out for new comers here and make sure you welcome them warmly, but don't be creepy. I also note the rise of the institutional multi author blog, great to see the scholarship getting out there, but wonder about the interaction. Leave a comment, seriously, it could be the difference between life and death . . . for that blog.

Thanks are due to our glorious coordinator Phil Long, to all you wonderful contributors, especially to those who took the time to nominate, and of course to me for giving up my time and considerable talent to put his carnival together . . . you are most welcome! Of course linking does not entail endorsement, use your critical faculties if you have them . . . if you don't, GET OFF THE INTERNET! (seriously it is not a good place for you.)

The next carnival is at Theolgians, Inc. Be sure to fill up their inbox with all your blogging goodies.

And do bookmark me or put me in your feed reader. On a good day I really am the best blogger in the world. I'm just starting a PhD in Mark's gospel and his interpretation of scripture, so if that is your bag be sure to keep in touch.


Oh yeah, the carnival is too big G%&gle wouldn't let me upload it in one post so go here for OT, here for Apocrypha and Gospels, here for Paul and the rest of the NT, and here for EVERYTHING else. Sorry for the inconvenience.

(Apologies also for the lack of proof reading, unfortunately wrestling with G@#gle to let me post this beast took up the time allocated for that!) 



 

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