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About ξἐνος

Haere Mai (welcome)

This blog is mainly the work of Jonathan Robinson, a resident alien in New Zealand. Its title ξἐνος (xenos) is an ancient Greek word used in the Bible to describe a resident alien. 'Resident alien' also functions as a good metaphor for being a follower of Jesus in the world.

This blog is a work in progress, written by a work in progress. Everything herein is provisional and offered in humility. Please leave a comment, I value your thoughts.

I'm currently a PhD student at Otago University, NZ, on hiatus from being an NZ Baptist pastor, and was previous on faculty at Carey Baptist College. The views expressed in this blog are my own and do not (necessarily) reflect or represent any organisation I am or have been a part of.

Thanks for reading,
Manaaki Atua (God bless) :-)

Popular posts from this blog

The so-called "Slogans" of 1 Corinthians: Introduction

I will begin our discussion of slogans in 1 Corinthians by looking at 1 Corinthians 6:12-20 and revisiting some of my work from my MTh thesis.  Then I plan to address every every possible instance of Corinthian slogans in 1 Corinthians paying attention to the resulting exegetical and theological ramifications of the argument.  Let me know what you think, :-)
Jay Smith defines a Corinthian slogan as,
[A] motto (or similar expression that captures the spirit, purpose, or guiding principles) of a particular group or point of view at Corinth, or at least a motto that Paul was using to represent their position or attitudes.[1]
Smith rightly warns that there is a risk in not attributing slogans, that the interpreter might mistake the Corinthians’ words for Paul’s.[2]  What also needs to be acknowledged is the risk of mistaking Paul’s words for the Corinthians’.   Although there is a range of nuances to the way such slogans might be derived and operate the basic question is whether or not thos…

Taking Words out of Paul's Mouth?

Usually we complain when people put words into our mouths, "I didn't say that!" But there has been a tendency in Bible translation as well as scholarship to take some of Paul's words in 1 Corinthians out of his mouth and place them in "speech marks" to suggest that he is quoting someone else or somehow distancing himself from what is said.



In my article "The Argument against Attributing Slogans in 1 Corinthians 6:12–20" just published in the Journal for the Study of Paul and His Letters Vol. 8, Nos. 1-2 (2018), pp. 147-166, I take issue with this practice. There are three possible slogans (so called because they are pithy axiomatic sayings that Corinthians Christians had allegedly been using to refute or corrupt Paul's teaching) in the passage 1 Cor 6:12-20.

Here it is in the NRSV

6:12 “All things are lawful for me,” but not all things are beneficial. “All things are lawful for me,” but I will not be dominated by anything. 13 “Food is meant for…

How to use Google Docs and Translate to make a Quick Rough Translation of a Modern Language Document (for FREE)

We all know that there is no substitute for knowing the language and that Google translate can make amusing mistakes. However, the ability to quickly make rough translations saves a great deal of time and also allows you to (carefully) engage in language literature that doesn't come up frequently enough to be worth learning, but has that one article you really want to read.

1. Make a good quality PDF scan of the document with one page per scan. (this may mean twice the number of scan pages, but it will save you time in the long run, trust me) I use a piece of paper to blank the page I don't want to copy in each scan. Ensure the scans are straight and all on the same orientation.

2. Save the resulting PDF in Google Drive.

3. Right click on the PDF in Google Drive and [open with] [Google Docs]. This will open a new window in your browser and will take some time - now is a good time to recite some verb conjugations. This is because Google's OCR is turning the scan into text b…