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Updated Current Research and Book Reviews

So, my PhD must be going well because I have just spent the morning updating my blog pages for Current Research and brand spanking new Book Reviews page. But it is not just procrastination, it is good to stop and and get an overview.

I had totally forgotten about half the book reviews I had done on this blog, they go back to 2009! I am still working on writing the sort of reviews I really enjoy reading, but now that I'm regularly doing reviews for journals it is great to also review books on this blog where I have stylistic freedom and no space limitations. I had always hoped this blog would be a good source of free books, but while it was a source of free books they were not good ones. Reviewing for journals (as a PhD student) has been much better and is helping me keep my broader education going even as I delve deep into my PhD subject. Looking at my old book reviews helps me realise how far I have come. Hopefully, much growth as a blogger, scholar and human being (perhaps not in that order?) still to come.

Also I should probably let my long suffering blog readers know that I now have two pieces of work (a journal article and a book chapter) "forthcoming", that is scholarspeak for saying they are going to be published, the editors have accepted them, but because the wheels of academic publishing grind exceedingly slow, I really have no idea whether that will be this year or next year or sometime further off. But this blog is now written by a *nearly* PUBLISHED SCHOLAR, so let's have a little more respect around here then, OK?

Let me know what you think :-)

Comments

  1. Woo hoo! Hope those editors push the pieces through sooner rather than later :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hmm, me too, but I wont hold my breath! :-)

    ReplyDelete

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