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ANZABS Papers Dec 6-7


Here is the lineup for this years ANZABS conf. in Auckland hosted by the Good Shepherd College.  I've enboldended the ones I'd be especially keen to hear.  I'm pretty sure I'm gonna go, I might just take the time to read the abstracts and make sure.
  • Paul Trebilco, “The Distribution of Self-Designations in Acts”
  • Carlos Olivares, “A Narrative and Textual Critical Analysis of Matt 27:16-17: Jesus Barabbas or Barabbas?”
  • Keith Stuart, “1 Kings 4:19 - 8:22 Text as Artefact - an Archivist's Perspective”
  • Jacqui Lloyd, “The Contribution of the Women in Luke 8.3”       
  • Chris Marshall, “Why Didn't They Stop? The Priest, the Levite and the Bystander Effect”
  • Don Moffat, “The Identity of the Exiles in Ezekiel and Ezra”
  • Vince David, “The Matthean Great Commission”
  • Debra Anstis, “Judas Iscariot as Necessary: A Typological Approach to Yom Kippur”
  • Bob Robinson, “Christ the Exegete: a Theological Reading of Luke 4:16-30 in a Contemporary Context of Religious Plurality”
  • Sean du Toit, “Conversion in 1 Thessalonians”
  • Yael Klangwisan, “The Enigma of Life and Death in the Song of Songs”
  • Geoff Aimers, “Redeeming the Joban Satan”
  • Robert Myles, “The Flight to Egypt and Jesus’ Dislocation”
  • Mark Keown, “Paul and Rome”
  • Tim Harris, “Paul's Former Self as a Dialogue Partner in his Letter to the Romans.
  • Sarah Hart, “Recent Research on the Tent of Meeting" 
  • James Harding, “Theological Hermeneutics/Engendering False Prophecy: A response to Walter Moberly's reading of false prophecy in Jeremiah”

To register email Yael

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